Economic Development

Economic Development

New Horizon paper out: “The Future of Jobs”

By Mark Prado
Jobs

Jobs, jobs, jobs. Intended as a report to inform the wider regional planning effort called Horizon being undertaken by the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), a new perspective paper explores the future of jobs in the region. Read More

Economic Development

Ghosting comes to the workplace

By Mark Prado
Ghosting

The practice of "ghosting," once the domain of the dating world, has now crept into the workplace, as the number of jobs outpaces the number of workers. Read More

Telecommuting On Rise In Bay Area, But Do Bosses and Co-Workers Trust Employees Who Work From Home?
Economic Development
Mark Prado November 27, 2018
By Mark Prado
Telecommuting

An MTC Vital Signs report shows more employees than ever are working from home as a way to avoid traffic and public transit.

New Data from U.S. Census Shows (Mostly) Broad and Steady Employment Growth, Highlights Changing Nature of Bay Area Economy
Economic Development
Chirag Rabari April 23, 2018
By Chirag Rabari
Construction on the San Francisco Skyline

The latest U.S. Census data from the 2016 County Business Patterns series shows continued overall growth for the nine-county Bay Area in employment as well as the number of business establishments. While the news is mostly good, the data also reveals some soft spots, and further highlights some of the disparities that have developed between different parts of the Bay Area, as well as between different industries. In this post, we’ll take a deep dive into the latest data to look at: Bay Area Employment, or the number of employees as of the First Quarter of a given year, and Bay Area Business

Economic Development

Regional Economic Divergence and the Conundrums of Prosperity; ABAG's Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy

By Chirag Rabari
Mare Island Naval Shipyard

Over at the Upshot, Emily Badger is asking a difficult, important question: What happens when globalization and technology cause big, rich cities in the U.S. to lose their links to smaller cities and rural areas? The piece starts with an examination of how the Bay Area economy has changed over recent decades: Well before anyone thought of this place as the center of the tech economy, the Bay Area built ships. And it did so with the help of many parts of the country. Douglas fir trees logged in the Pacific Northwest were turned into lumber schooners here. Steel from the East, brought in by Read More