Housing

Housing

The Crash and Rise of the US Housing Market, 2000-2017

Housing Construction in Vacaville
Karl Nielsen

Check out this very cool Tableau visualization from Jacob Olsufka at Decisive Data: The Crash and Rise of the US Housing Market, 2000-2017. It looks at a large number of cities across the United States and breaks down in chart, map, and graph form whether homes prices were increasing or decreasing in a given month and year between 2000 and 2017. It gives a good sense of just how widespread and long-lasting the carnage was during the Great Recession, and by contrast how healthy the overall housing market was (with a few notable exceptions) as of the latest available data in August 2017.

The visualization is excerpted below but should ideally be viewed full-screen to really do it justice. Read More

Housing

International Comparisons of Intergenerational Trends: Income, Labor, Housing and Wealth

Tokyo Skyline
According to a new report from the Resolution Foundation, Japan significantly increased its per-capita housing stock between 1990 and 2015. The United States, by contrast, lost ground over the same period. Image Credit: iStock/Getty, yongyuan.

Led by MTC and ABAG, Vital Signs is the Bay Area’s performance monitoring initiative, tracking key trends related to transportation, land and people, the economy, the environment and social equity.  Vital Signs puts data in local, regional and national context by evaluating indicators over time, examining differences between cities and counties, and comparing the Bay Area with other peer metropolitan areas. 

Sometimes, zooming out to the international level can be just as illuminating. This new report – International Comparisons of Intergenerational Trends – from the Resolution Foundation, a British think tank, is definitely worth a look. The report “explores the extent to which the UK’s generational living standards challenge is replicated in other high-income economies,” focusing on trends in income gains and losses, labor markets, and housing and wealth for younger adults and millennials. 

The report has lots of fascinating findings (key points excerpted in full below), but one particularly interesting data point concerns relatively low housing stock levels, especially among primarily English-speaking countries – all of whose younger generations, it should be noted, are facing major housing price pressures.  Read More

Policy

What's Holding Us Back? Talking Bay Area Transportation and Housing

Last week's annual State of the Valley Conference hosted by Joint Venture Silicon Valley featured a panel entitled What's Holding Us Back? – a look at the twin transportation and housing challenges facing Silicon Valley and the Bay Area as a whole.

MTC and ABAG Executive Director Steve Heminger and moderator Russell Hancock, Joint Venture's CEO, opened the conversation with an initial focus on the transportation side of the ledger. They were later joined by Carol Galante, Donald Terner Distinguished Professor in Affordable Housing & Urban Policy and director of the Terner Center for Housing Innovation at the University of California at Berkeley, as the conversation shifted to housing.

Topics ranged widely, from the elusive search for a "big fix" to "Self-Help" funding for transportation, from CASA – The Committee to House the Bay Area to Silicon Valley's political engagement on the housing crisis.

Transcripts of the conversations, edited for length and clarity, are available from the Silicon Valley Business Journal. Read More

Resiliency

The Dangers of Housing Loss in an Earthquake

Earthquake Damage

This past fall, the four 2017 North Bay Wildfires damaged or destroyed an estimated 8,900 structures, taking out a major chunk of Santa Rosa’s (and the wider region’s) housing stock. It served as an uneasy reminder of the potential dangers the Bay Area and its residents face from other ever-present natural hazards, such as earthquakes. For example: How many buildings could be damaged? How many households displaced? How many residents in need of shelter?

A new page from ABAG’s Resilience Program, Expected Housing Losses in an Earthquake, provides the latest and greatest research findings about the region’s seismic risk – including the fact that up to 70,000 residential buildings could be made uninhabitable. In the below video, Dana Brechwald, Resilience Planner, discusses the research and details the residential building damage estimates and displacement risks for 16 different earthquake scenarios. Read More

Housing

ABAG Launches Exciting New Online Housing Data Portal, Regional Permitting Activity in 2016 Disappoints

Housing Permit Activity

On the Bay Area housing beat there’s good news and bad news. 

The good news is that at yesterday’s ABAG Regional Planning Committee meeting, staff unveiled an exciting new online housing data portal. The portal provides easy access to data related to housing permit activity as well as local adoption of housing policies in the 101 towns and cities and nine counties of the San Francisco Bay Area.

The permitting data will allow users to see the affordability level (very low, low, moderate, or above moderate income), housing type (single family, multifamily, mobile home, second unit) and location of every single unit permitted in the region from 2014-16. The policy data will let users see the housing policies and programs that jurisdictions across the region are using to increase housing supply and affordability, preserve existing housing choices, and protect residents from displacement. Read more on ABAG’s website or check out the portal for yourself. 

The bad news is, well, what the data actually says. Read More

MTC-ABAG

Beyond the Headlines: Reading Recommendations from the MTC-ABAG Library, with a Spotlight on Housing

Hands hold a tablet with text on it; a large book is below the tablet. A cup of coffee and a croissant are in the background.

Love our daily news headlines but craving some deeper knowledge? Settle in for some in-depth reading on the important issues affecting our region. This month we highlight some publications that contextualize and illuminate the regional housing crisis, including this thorough literature review from CASA and a handy summary of the significant housing bills passed in California in 2017.

Other topics included in this month’s reading list include Regional Measure 3, local Bay Area transportation projects, transit ridership, automated vehicles, and climate change. Read More

Housing

Interested in Housing & Development Legislation? Attend the First "Planning Innovations" Forum of 2018 on February 13!

A construction worker working on the roof of an unfinished house.
Karl Nielsen

Given recently passed state housing legislation and lawsuits against local jurisdictions, cities face increasing scrutiny when approving or denying housing development proposals. MTC’s long-running Planning Innovations series kicks off 2018 with a timely workshop on these issues, How Objective is "Objective"? Effective Development Standards in the SB35 and Housing Accountability Act Era. The workshop will be held starting at 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday, February 13, at the Bay Area Metro Center in San Francisco; register and see additional details here. Read More

Funding

MTC Approves $386 Million for 180 Projects Across the Region Through the OBAG 2 County Program

Bicyclist and buildings

The stage is set for $386 million in federal funds to go to 180 transportation projects in 95 jurisdictions across all nine Bay Area Counties with last month's MTC commissioner approval of the One Bay Area Grant 2 (OBAG 2) County Program of Projects. OBAG 2, which also has a Regional Program, is the policy framework for MTC’s distribution of $862 million in federal Surface Transportation Program and Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program funds from Fiscal Years 2017-18 to 2021-2022.

In the below video, MTC’s Mallory Atkinson provides an overview of the program and highlights some key facts, figures and policy considerations as the OBAG 2 County Program moves ahead.  Read More

Housing

How Big a House? So Much Depends Upon... Location, Location, Location

December Map of the Month

The latest Map of the Month from MTC Executive Director Steve Heminger looks at an often under-examined issue in housing policy: How big are the houses? As can be seen, the median square footage of a housing unit can vary widely depending upon the metro area. The San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward metropolitan statistical area, where the median square footage of a housing unit comes in at under 1,300 square feet, is on the smaller side. The largest median housing units are generally found in Southern metros, as well as the Denver-area in Colorado.  Read More

Housing

CASA: Drafting a Blueprint for a Better Bay Area

It’s no secret that that the Bay Area has one of the most severe housing crisis in the nation. In poll after poll, area residents have ranked housing affordability as one of the region’s greatest challenges. The data backs it up too. In an effort to develop and implement game-changing solutions to this crisis, MTC and ABAG have convened CASA – The Committee to House the Bay Area

CASA has brought together nearly 50 leaders from every conceivable sector across the Bay Area with the goal of figuring out how to build an actionable political consensus around increasing housing production, preserving existing affordable housing, and protecting vulnerable populations from housing displacement. Read More