Resiliency

Resiliency

Fed report on climate change highlights MTC-backed Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge

Resilient by Design
Allison Brooks speaking at a Resilient by Design press conference. Photo by Cosimo Bullo.

The Bay Area Regional Collaborative — which includes MTC, the Association of Bay Area Governments, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District and the Bay Conservation and Development Commission — today earned recognition by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco with publication of a new paper authored by BARC Executive Director Allison Brooks in the bank's Community Development Innovation Review. Read More

Resiliency

Special Issue of “Estuary News” Explores the Resilient By Design Bay Area Challenge

Resilient By Design Bay Area Challenge

The latest special issue of ESTUARY News magazine is now available and takes a deep dive into the Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge, which in May 2017 selected nine high-powered teams from across the globe to come up with innovative design ideas that address sea level rise and resilience to climate change around the region.

Last month, after a year-long process, Resilient by Design shared the final design concepts developed by local residents, community organizations, public officials and local, national, and international experts. These concepts were “meant to inspire, catalyze action, and push us along the path to a more resilient future.

The June 2018 Issue of ESTUARY News explores each of the individual Bay Area Challenge design concepts in more detail and puts the whole Challenge in wider context, including where we might go from here. Keep reading to find out more! Read More

Resiliency

Resilient by Design San Francisco Showcase Open from May 22 to June 1, Reception on May 23

Keeping Seal Level Rise at Bay Poster

We recently highlighted the nine final proposals for adapting to sea level rise in vulnerable locations around the Bay that came out of the year-long Resilient by Design | Bay Area Challenge. Now, you have a chance to take in these innovative projects first-hand at Keeping Sea Level Rise at Bay: Resilient by Design | Bay Area Challenge | San Francisco Design Showcase.

The design showcase will be on display for public viewing from May 22 to June 1 at the Bay Area Metro Center lobby, 375 Beale Street in San Francisco, and open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays.

In addition, Resilient by Design, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and the East Cut Community Benefit District invite members of the public join them for a reception and talk this Wednesday, May 23, to learn more about the just-unveiled innovative designs for mitigating sea level rise at the Bay’s edge:

Reception and Talk: Wednesday, May 23, 2018, 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Location: Bay Area Metro Center, 375 Beale Street, San Francisco, CA

More information and tickets are available on the Resilient by Design | Bay Area Challenge website.  Read More

Resiliency

Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge Final Projects Revealed

Bird Tower on the Grand Bay Way
Common Ground/Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge

The evidence is everywhere: sea levels are on the rise and countries around the world must adapt before disaster strikes. The San Francisco Bay Area is at the forefront of this nascent adaptation effort with the Resilient by Design Bay Area Challenge, which in May 2017 selected nine high-powered teams from across the globe to come up with innovative design ideas that address sea level rise and resilience to climate change around the region.

Now, a year later, Resilient by Design is excited to share the final design concepts developed by local residents, community organizations, public officials and local, national, and international experts. These concepts are “meant to inspire, catalyze action, and push us along the path to a more resilient future.

Keep reading on to view a clickable map as well as video summaries of each project.  Read More

Resiliency

The HayWired Earthquake Scenario: Tools and Resources to Outsmart Disaster

[This post is adapted from a news release on ABAG’s website.]

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its many partners, including the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), have unveiled a new scenario and public outreach campaign to showcase what could happen during a major earthquake in the San Francisco Bay area along the Hayward Fault and help the public prepare for and recover from an earthquake. The HayWired Earthquake Scenario is intended to build awareness of earthquake risk and help Bay Area residents understand what they can do to mitigate risks and bounce back once the shaking stops. The public-engagement campaign – Outsmart Disaster – offers many resources, including a new fact sheet, on-line at https://outsmartdisaster.com/. Read More

Resiliency

Staff Dispatch: Learning From the Mexico City Earthquake

Mexico City Earthquake
Brina Bunt

* First in an occasional series of dispatches from MTC and ABAG staff about their experiences out in the field.  

On September 19, 2017, Mexico City experienced a damaging magnitude 7.1 earthquake, resulting in the deaths of 228 people and the collapse of 44 buildings. The 2017 earthquake occurred on the 35th anniversary of another deadly earthquake in the city that killed nearly 10,000 people. 

Due to geological, building construction and social factors, Mexico City is highly vulnerable to earthquakes. Much of the city sits on an ancient lake bed that has been drained over the last several centuries to accommodate the city’s expansion. This geology leads to significant subsidence and loose soils, which worsens ground shaking and can cause liquefaction in earthquake events.

In addition, although Mexico’s current building codes are similar to those in the Bay Area, many existing buildings date back decades or centuries, before these codes were in place. Nearly 60 percent of residential buildings are self-built without permits or inspections, meaning they don’t comply with any codes at all. Many of these residents are also highly vulnerable due to their social status – they often lack savings, insurance, secure jobs or even legal rights to their own homes.

The earthquake was a reminder to those of us in the Bay Area about the ever-present hazards of living in our own region. Read More